HFCS is nothing like the sugar in fruit

HFCS has been marketed as a “natural sugar” being just like the sugar found in fruit. Well nothing could be further from the truth. Not only is it molecularly unlike leveulose, fruit sugar, it is also metabolized and absorbed differently. HFCS is very cheap and has made its way into literally tens of thousands of products from bread to beer. And unfortunately it’s even used in health foods from protein bars to powders. Read about why this heavily marketed product should be avoided completely here.

Perfect Pecs

Like a great set of developed arms, a well developed chest always gets attention.? Chest and arms are the most frequently worked body parts in any gym across the country.? You never hear of anyone skipping a chest workout to do legs, but frequently hear people skipping their leg workout.? Most of this is due to shear laziness, but some is because chest is much more fun to work.

In their quest for an “Arnold like” chest many people look for that one exercise or that one workout that, like magic, will give them the chest they want.? Unfortunately, genetics, as with all body parts, determines the size and shape of ones chest.? This doesn’t mean, however, that one can’t improve upon what they have.

Do not get caught up in the game of trying to make your muscles look a certain way.? You will consistently be disappointed.? Instead concentrate on making the best of what you’ve got.? You can do this by hitting the chest from a variety of angles.? It is also imperative you “feel” the muscle being worked.? Concentrating on feeling your chest work is as important as performing the exercises. And last, using TEMPO to increase muscle tension is essential and will help to improve your concentration level.?

Learn more about these and other guidelines to build Perfect Pecs.

Set your thermostat for better sleep

Sleep deprivation can lead to serious health risks both mentally and physically. Not getting enough sleep can lead to depression, irritability, mood swings, cardiovascular disease, slower reaction times, impaired concentration, impaired decision making, decreased test scores, impaired immune system, and more.

Sleep deprivation affects millions of Americans and as with most things, our ability to get quality sleep decreases as we age. In the following article from the New York Times avoiding caffeine, drinking milk before bed time, and other lifestyle changes are not the only ways to increase ones quality of sleep.

Studies have found that in general, the optimal temperature for sleep is quite cool, around 60 to 68 degrees Fahrenheit. For some, temperatures that fall too far below or above this range can lead to restlessness.

Temperatures in this range, it seems, help facilitate the decrease in core body temperature that in turn initiates sleepiness. A growing number of studies are finding that temperature regulation plays a role in many cases of chronic insomnia. Researchers have shown, for example, that insomniacs tend to have a warmer core body temperature than normal sleepers just before bed, which leads to heightened arousal and a struggle to fall asleep as the body tries to reset its internal thermostat.

For normal sleepers, the drop in core temperature is marked by an increase in temperature in the hands and feet, as the blood vessels dilate and the body radiates heat. Studies show that for troubled sleepers, a cool room and a hot-water bottle placed at the feet, which rapidly dilates blood vessels, can push the internal thermostat to a better setting.

The first UNstationary bike

Are you interested in getting in shape and losing some weight but you’re bored and find it hard to get motivated. Do you need something new, something exciting? The RealRyder just might be what the doctor ordered.

The RealRyder was released earlier this year and is revolutionizing indoor cycling. The RealRyder ABF8 vision began 15 years ago when competitive cyclist and RealRyder International co-founder, Colin Irving, saw a need to improve the performance of the stationary bike to simulate the real bike experience. Colin shared his dream and joined industry expert Sean Harrington, whose fitness contributions include the Heart Mate Stationary Bike, and pioneering of Nautilus as a successful fitness club chain operation, to bring this product to market. Rich Hanson, who helped bring the Stairmaster to market, is also largely involved in RealRyder and its current success.

Unlike fixed stationary bikes, the RealRyder Indoor Bike has a patented articulating frame which allows the user to ride fluidly in three dimensions. The RealRyder leans 45 degrees to the left and right which simulates turning and banking on the road so you can get the benefits of riding outdoors, inside. Riding indoors is no longer just a leg workout, it’s a total body experience.

Fitness Myths Busted

Is performing cardio the best way to lose fat?
There are 3 things to keep in mind about cardio when trying to get leaner. One is that it doesn?t build muscle. Two, it doesn?t preserve muscle while losing weight. Both are extremely important if your goal is not only to get leaner, but to stay that way. As we lose weight the body does not discriminate where the weight comes from. We lose muscle along with fat, especially on a low calorie diet. And performing cardio accentuates this phenomenon.

Lastly, unless you enjoy cardiovascular training, it?s just not worth the time. The work to benefit ratio is dismal to say the least. Unless you?re willing to bust your butt and perform 60 ? 90 minutes of cardio a day, which will hinder your muscle building capacity, cardio is not worth it.

Will training your abs using the right exercise our equipment give you washboard abs?

Is reducing your calories the best way to lose weight?

If I’m not sore a couple of days after a workout, did I not train hard enough?

Get the answers to these and other common fitness myths in my Fitness Myths Busters article.

Almonds to beat down that hunger

Looking for a snack to kill that between meal hunger? Try almonds. 28g, aproximatey 20 – 25 alomonds provides 5.9g of protein, 13.8g of fat, and 6.1g of carbohydrates. Don’t be alarmed by the fat content. The fat is what will suppress your appetite, and 62% of the fat found in almonds is oleic acid. In comparison, olive oil contains 71% oleic acid. This fatty acid has strong anti-inflammatory properties and is what gives olive oil it’s outstanding reputation. 7% of the fat content is palmitic acid and 2 percent is stearic acid. Both of these saturated fatty acids are the preferred energy source of the heart, which is why the fat surrounding the heart is highly saturated.

Unfortunately, up to 30% of the fat found in almonds is the polyunsaturated fat linoleic acid. This is a double unsaturated omega 6 fatty acid that has been shown to be pro-inflammatory, immuno-suppressive, and shown to cause weight gain. Thankfully, almonds have enough of the good fats to compensate for the bad polyunsaturated fats.

A good source of fiber 20 -25 almonds contain 3.4g. Also Rich in minerals, almonds contain good amounts of calcium, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. So if your feeling hungry and you need something to munch on to hold you till the next meal, give almonds a try.

Nutritionaldata.com
Westonaprice.com
Enig,Mary. Know Your Fats. Silver Spring: Bethesda Press, 2000

School lunches worse than fast food

A few days ago USA Today reported on the failure of our government to supply quality food to the children of our nation. The report claims the meat supplied to our children at school, in many instances wouldn’t even meet the standards of fast food restaurants. Does this surprise anybody that the government is doing a worse job than private industry? Worse than fast food? Really? And this is what millions of developing children are fueling theirs bodies with.

In the past three years, the government has provided the nation’s schools with millions of pounds of beef and chicken that wouldn’t meet the quality or safety standards of many fast-food restaurants, from Jack in the Box and other burger places to chicken chains such as KFC, a USA TODAY investigation found.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the meat it buys for the National School Lunch Program “meets or exceeds standards in commercial products.”

That isn’t always the case. McDonald’s, Burger King and Costco, for instance, are far more rigorous in checking for bacteria and dangerous pathogens. They test the ground beef they buy five to 10 times more often than the USDA tests beef made for schools during a typical production day.

And the limits Jack in the Box and other big retailers set for certain bacteria in their burgers are up to 10 times more stringent than what the USDA sets for school beef.
(USA Today)

Bromide for a sluggish thyroid

Bromides are a common endocrine disruptor. It is found in commercial bread products and some flours as potassium bromate. In the 1960′s it replaced postassium iodate as a dough conditioner, which has been major contributor to hypothyroid.

Bromide is a halide and competes for the same receptors as iodine in the thyroid gland. This is why bromide will inhibit thyroid hormone production resulting in a hypothyroid state. Unfortunately, or fortunately depending on how you look at it, it appears that the only method for removal of this halide from these receptors is in supplying iodine in forms such as Lugol’s liquid or Iodoral.

Where can you find bromide?

*Pesticides (specifically methyl bromide, used mainly on strawberries, predominantly in California)

*Plastics, like those used to make computers

*Bakery goods and some flours often contain a ?dough conditioner? called potassium bromate

*Soft drinks (including Mountain Dew, Gatorade, Sun Drop, Squirt, Fresca and other citrus-flavored sodas), in the form of brominated vegetable oils (BVOs)

*Medications such as Atrovent Inhaler, Atrovent Nasal Spray, Pro-Banthine (for ulcers), and anesthesia agents

*Fire retardants (common one is polybromo diphenyl ethers or PBDEs) used in fabrics, carpets, upholstery, and mattresses

*Bromine-based hot tub and swimming pool treatments

(Mercola.com)

Squat and dead lift vs stability ball exercises for core activation

Unstable Surface Training (UST) has moved from being used almost exclusively in rehabilitation to becoming common place among personal trainers and strength coaches. One can’t go to a gym and not see somebody training on a Bosu ball, stability ball, wobble board or foam pad. It’s so popular entire books have been written on this type of training. But do not be fooled by its popularity.

UST is not popular because it works, but because of a tremendous media campaign. The fitness industry is always looking for something new. They know here’s huge money in marketing a piece of equipment and/or workout program.

Performing exercises on unstable equipment can be challenging no doubt, but research has not shown that the type of balance, and core stability developed through UST will transfer to any sports skill. Performing exercises on unstable equipment will make an individual proficient at performing resistance exercises on unstable surfaces but will not improve sports performance. Is UST training even necessary?

Researchers from Appalachian State University compared trunk muscle activity during stability ball and free weight exercises. The stability ball exercises utilized were the quadruped, pelvic thrust and ball back extensions. The free weight exercises were the squat (SQ) and deadlift (DL). During all exercises muscle activity was collected using electromyography (EMG).

During the study trunk muscle activity during SQ and DL’s was equal to or greater than which was produced during stability ball exercises. This was true even when 50% of the 1 rep max was used during SQ and DL. The role of UST is again shown to be in question.
(Journal of Strength Conditioning Research 22:95-101,2008)

Vegetables and heart disease

An analysis of the Prospect ? EPIC cohort, which consisted of 16057 post menopausal women between the ages of 49 ? 70, found vitamin K reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). None of the participants had CVD at the start of the study. Those who got their vitamin K by eating leafy green vegetables had the same risk of CVD as the general population. Those who obtained their vitamin K by eating whole eggs, cheese, goose liver, and animal fats had a substantially reduced incidence of CVD when compared to the general population. (Wise Traditions 2009;10(2):11)

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