Low testosterone and depression

Low testosterone levels in older men are associated with an increased risk of depression, according to an?Australian study.

Between 2001 and 2004, researchers at the University of Western Australia in Perth studied 3,987 males aged 71 to 89. The men provided demographic and health information and were tested for depression and cognitive difficulties. The researchers also checked the men’s testosterone levels.

The 203 men who met the criteria for depression had significantly lower total and free (not bound to proteins) testosterone levels than those who weren’t depressed. After controlling for other factors, such as cognitive scores, education level and body-mass index, the researchers concluded that men in the lowest quintile (20 percent) of free testosterone were three times more likely to have depression compared to those in the highest quintile.

The findings were published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

There is more and more evidence mounting?for?medically supervised?hormone replacement therapy.?
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Did you know… which is better, Cialis or Viagra

In a previous Did you know… column, which offers research, trends and other info to help with your fitness, health and nutritional needs. I reveal that: testosterone has been proven to help protect against heart disease; Cialis offers spontaneity over Viagra; how you can break your johnson, partial reps can be productive; and more.

Did you know…

?that half of all men over the age of 30 experience problems getting erections at one point or another. Viagra since its introduction has increased the sexual capacities of many men with erectile dysfunction (ED). Cialis is a new drug for the treatment of ED and was introduced in 2003. The side effects are the same as Viagra; headaches, flushing, heartburn and nasal congestion. Cialis, however, works faster than Viagra and lasts between 24 and 36 hours. Cialis allows a man to be more spontaneous.

?you can actually break your penis. Normally when we talk about breaking a part of the body we are concerned with bones. However, when fully erect the penis becomes almost as hard as bone. If you were to have vigorous sex and unintentionally slip out, the force of missing the target could cause a break. The tubes (corposa cavernosa) that are filled with blood can rupture. This can be accompanied by a popping sound, extreme pain and severe swelling. Unfortunately, the damage is difficult to repair and some men are prevented from ever having full erections. (mypleasure.com)

Full article HERE

  

Testosterone protects against heart disease

Low testosterone levels are associated with a greater risk of heart attacks, diabetes, abdominal fat deposition and abnormal blood lipid levels. Cytokins, which cause inflammation in the arteries, are the latest suspected cause of heart disease. British researchers suggest testosterone suppresses cytokins and also boosts the immune system, thereby preventing heart disease. (J Endocrinol, 178: 373-380, 2003)

  

Low testosterone not good for male bone

Low testosterone levels may boost the risk of fractures for men over 60, an Australian study finds.

The researchers tracked 609 men (average age 72.6) between 1989 and late 2005.

The University of Sydney researchers collected information about the men’s bone mineral density, lifestyle habits, and blood levels of testosterone and estradiol (an estrogen).

During the study period, 113 men suffered low-trauma fractures (caused by a fall from standing height or lower). Of those men, 25 suffered multiple fractures.

There were a total of 149 fractures, including 55 vertebral, 27 hip, 28 rib, six wrist and 16 upper- and 17 lower-extremity fractures.

The risk of fracture was much higher among men with low testosterone levels, the team found.

Even after adjusting for a variety of potential risk factors, low blood levels of the two hormones “were associated with overall fracture risk,” the study authors concluded. Fracture risk was associated “particularly with hip and non-vertebral fractures,” they noted.

The findings are published in the Jan. 14 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

Vitacost.com’s Daily Health Tip

  

Diet and Tesosterone Levels

A recent study performed in Finland included men ages 49 to 73 who underwent 21 weeks of supervised training and dieting. Half the subjects ate a high-fiber, low-fat diet including grains, fruits, vegetables, lean meat, fish and dairy. This diet led to a decline in men?s testosterone. The study also found that subjects who ate more protein and had a fat intake of at least 30 percent had higher levels of testosterone and improved muscular gains. Eating less than 30 percent fat seemed to adversely affect hormone levels. The amount of fiber did not have an adverse effect on building muscle or hormone levels. (Intl J Sports Med. 28(12):1070-1076)
(Did you know… 10-30-08)

  

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