Spider Venom for Erectile Dysfunction?


Free Image Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Whoever thought that spider venom could could be the answer for erectile dysfunction, however, emergency room visits in Brazil with victims of spider bites displaying priapism, or unrelenting and painful erections, got doctors thinking.

Some research has led to the isolation of an alternative way to help men attain and sustain an erection.

Viagra, Levitra and other ED drugs on the market work by inhibiting an enzyme called PDE5. To get an erection, a man’s body must release nitric oxide, which relaxes the smooth muscle around the arteries of the penis, allowing for his blood vessels to dilate.

The nitric oxide is a first step in a series of chemical reactions that allow this muscle relaxation to take place. One step in the series is cGMP, a signaling molecule that acts to keep the muscles relaxed. PDE5 degrades cGMP. That’s a good thing for ensuring that erections don’t last forever, but too much PDE5 can mean an erection doesn’t happen at all. By blocking the enzyme, PDE5 inhibitors solve the problem.

The spider toxin works differently. Instead of affecting PDE5, the compound seems to trigger nitric oxide release, acting directly to relax the smooth muscles. Because about 30 percent of patients don’t respond to PDE5 inhibitors, the toxin could provide an alternative to ED treatments currently on the market, Nunes said.

Three Health Issues Every Man Should Discuss With His Doctor


Free image courtesy of Fredigitaldownloads.net

Most men are squeamish about discussing their concerns about testosterone, erectile disfunction or trouble urinating, however these embarrassing topics could shed light on deeper more serious health issues like heart disease, cancer or hormone imbalance.

Since most visits to the doctor last less than 20 minutes, getting warmed up can take some effort.

Be armed with a list of questions and concerns to get the most out of your time with your physician.

Keep it cool, healthy family + healthy life = healthy heart

Keeping it cool with your loved one may be the best way to avoid stress and early heart disease.

Middle-age people who feel that their family members are excessively demanding or a source of worry are more than twice as likely as worry-free people to develop angina, the chest pain that occurs with exercise or exertion due to a reduced blood flow to the heart

Related Posts