Kneeling Dumbbell Curls

No other body part exemplifies strength and muscular development like arms. Big muscular arms are in high demand in gyms across this country. Go to any gym and you will always find somebody training arms. The same cannot be said for legs, as is obvious by the lack of leg development in a lot of men who workout.

One exercise that I think deserves a place in your program is kneeling dumbbell curls. They are performed just like standing dumbbell curls. Be prepared to use less weight than you do with standing dumbbell curls. Kneeling helps keep the body from assisting the movement.

  

Titanic triceps

Most people who workout love training their arms; rarely do you here of somebody skipping their arm workout. You never see somebody walking around with large muscular legs and skinny arms. In fact, it’s just the opposite. This is in no small part due to the fact that no other body part exemplifies strength and development, and is the envy of others like a muscular pair of arms. In the following article I walk you through one way to properly bang your your triceps to new growth.

All too often, a personal trainer or instructor will isolate a particular muscle so much that it becomes detrimental to the workout. You may be asking, “How can you isolate a muscle too much? Isn’t that what all the magazines say to do?” Yes, that is what a lot of magazines tell you to do, and I agree it’s good to isolate the muscle being worked. I’ll even go one step further and say that it is not only good but also absolutely necessary for optimum muscular growth. However, many instructors and fitness enthusiasts are so concerned with isolation exercises that they’re neglecting form and function.

How does form and function relate to triceps training? Let’s look at what the triceps actually do. The triceps extend, or straighten, the arm. For example, without your triceps it would be virtually impossible to grab a beer from the fridge. That would truly be a tragedy. Without triceps, your arm would be in a constant flexed state. This having been said, exercises that stress movement only at the elbow (such as triceps pressdowns) are solid movements. However, I am starting to see less and less multi-joint movements used in workouts. Examples of multi-joint movements for the triceps would be close grip bench presses, dips and a few others. These exercises involve not only the elbow joint but the shoulder joint as well.

9 Weeks to Bigger Arms

  

Rolling Triceps Extension

Men’s Fitness.com breaks down the rolling tricpes extension and why it’s ideal for building arm size and strength.

Hold a dumbbell in each hand and lie back on a bench with your arms locked out above your chest [1]. Bend your elbows until the dumbbells touch your shoulders, then “roll” your shoulders back so that your elbows go beside your head and you feel a stretch in your triceps and your lats. Reverse the motion by contracting your lats and triceps simultaneously to pull your arms forward and lock out your elbows [2]. That’s one rep.

Why It Works Essentially a combination of the lying triceps extension and pullover, the rolling extension allows you to use more weight as a result of the involvement of the lats. Perform the exercise for 10-12 reps, as going too heavy for low reps can be stressful on the elbow joint. Do not explosively lock out your elbows. “This is best used at the end of your workout,” says Ferruggia, “as a finisher after dips or bench presses.”

  

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