Bikini bodybuilding journey

Here’s a very interesting story as a reporter goes through a training cycle to compete in a figure competition. Wall Street Journal reporter Alyssa Abkowitz took on a more intense project after toning up for her wedding by entering into a fitness competition and discovering the world of bikini bodybuilding. In the video she discusses the process along with her diet and workout routines.

A conversation with Drew Brees’ trainer Todd Durkin about TRX Suspension Training

New Orleans Saints quarter back Drew Brees celebrates after the Saints defeated the Indianapolis Colts 31-17 in Super Bowl XLIV at Sun Life Stadium in Miami on February 7, 2010. Brees was named MVP for the game. UPI/Rob Hobson

At your local gym, you may have been offered a chance to try out a tool called the TRX Suspension Training, which is an innovation by former elite Navy SEAL Randy Hetrick.

As a Navy SEAL, Hetrick often found himself in remote safe houses with limited means to keep he and his soldiers in shape. Using only salvaged parachute materials, Hetrick created what would eventually be named the ?Best Total Body Tool? by Men?s Health magazine.

The TRX Suspension Trainer was born.

One of the many trainers that have incorporated TRX not only in his athletes? workouts, but also into his own workouts is Todd Durkin. Of the many athletes Todd works with during the offseason, perhaps his most recognized is New Orleans Saints? quarterback Drew Brees.

During the offseason, Brees flies all the way from Louisiana to train with Durkin and the TRX, which obviously speaks to Todd?s credibility as a trainer. And considering Brees is coming off a Super Bowl win this past February, clearly Todd?s methods work.

We recently had the opportunity to chat with Todd about a variety of topics, including his work with Drew, TRX and the ?Get with the Movement? campaign, which is defined as a rally cry that dares American fitness enthusiasts to free themselves of their everyday routine. It encourages people to get off their exercise machines and take a more dynamic, moment-focused approach to building their overall health and achieving personal goals.

We also asked Todd to share his favorite Drew Brees story, what specific workouts he uses to train a Super Bowl-winning quarterback and how the TRX can help everybody from the ?weekend warrior? to yes, even grandma.

For more on Todd, TRX and his new book The Impact! Body Plan, please visit www.fitnessquest10.com and www.todddurkin.com.

Also for more on the ?Get with the Movement? campaign, visit www.getwiththemovement.com.

Anthony Stalter: Hey Todd, how are you?

Todd Durkin: Real good! Things have been a little crazy around here, but it?s exciting with the new book coming out.

To read the entire interview, click here.

Interview with “no holds barred” powerlifter Dave Tate.

Recently Dave Tate spoke with Testosterone Muscle. A native of Findlay, Ohio, he is a world class powerlifter and businessman. Dave is well known for speaking his mind, not only on powerlifting, but on a wide variety of subjects.

Fuck Moderation

I have two speeds: blast and dust.

It’s just a personality trait. I’ve talked with a lot of entrepreneurs, top CEOs, business people, and athletes that operate in the same mode. You’re 100 percent on for weeks or months, just knocking everything out until nothing is left standing. And then, boom, you’re on the couch for three weeks. Training and business have been that way for me. Fuck moderation. I don’t have time for it.

If I have some Oreos, I’m going to eat the entire bag. I’m not going to have two or three. If I’m going to launch a business, I’m going to do it all the way. If I’m going to train my ass off, then I’m going to do it hardcore. I would rather have no cheat meal for 12 weeks and then eat like a fucking hog for a month, than just have a cookie here and there. I’m going to run on all cylinders and then just disappear.

What I’ve managed to figure out is that I can stagger the roles in my life. So if training is going to be in 100 percent blast, then I know business is going to be in dust. If business is going to be in blast, training is going to fall back in dust. That’s just the way it is.

Dave Tate Interview

Interview with trainer to the pros, Ed Downs.

Ed developed the patented Downs Disc Fitness System, a training and exercise system. It is used and endorsed by professional athletes, the University of Miami basketball team, high schools around the country, rehab centers, pregnant women, and thousands of people with weight, type 2 diabetes and respiratory problems. Without corporate funding, Ed realizing his dream through self-financing (by asking clients to pay him in advance), taking out a second mortgage and the sweat equity of 14-hour days.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview:

BE: You?re actually training the natural form and function of how the body works.

ED: How the body works. How the body works my man. I love talking to somebody that understands what I?m talking about. Because sometimes it sounds so technical but it?s not really that technical.

BE: That?s kind of what attracted?you know when Stephanie gave me the e-mails and I started looking into your stuff, that?s what really attracted to me to your style of training. And there are some other coaches out there, not the same obviously but they have similar?they?re trying to accomplish the same goal. You?re taking, which actually in the lab is a fairly complex subject, and you?re making it very simple. You?re just doing what the body does.

ED: What it does. I mean, thank you. When we walk, you take your right foot forward and your left arm goes out. We don?t walk with your right foot forward and your right arm going at the same time; you would look goofy as hell. So we want to work in patterns of our natural movement. So I don?t care if I?m working with a lady or a man. A lady carrying a baby and getting ready to put it in her car seat; she?s kind of awkward when she?s reaching and bending down and they wonder why they twist their back. So I?ve got to be able to train their bodies to be able to move in unexpected movement, right?

Read the rest of the interview, HERE.

Mickey Rourke discusses his training methods for “The Wrestler”

After hitting rock bottom, Mickey Rourke resurrected his career with his role in “The Wrestler.” He’s received numerous awards and he’s also been nominated for an Oscar.

Brad Balfour interviewed Rourke about his comeback, which included a discussion of his training methods for the film.

Q: What did you do to get into shape to play “The Ram?”

MR: It was a process over six months of putting on the weight. I had to put on muscle and not fat and I had never done that before. I’ve had to lose weight–20 pounds over 12 weeks–and I thought that was murder. So, I thought, ‘Oh great, I get to eat.’ You can’t just eat anything or you’re going to put fat on. But you’re going to put fat on anyway, because you’re eating six or seven meals a day.

You have to make sure you’re doing the weight lifting and the cardio, so it’s like never ending in the gymnasium for me. I have to admit, since I’ve done the movie, I haven’t walked into a gym. I’ve just done weights at home. I just can’t go to a gym yet, because it was hell…

Q: How many months did you train?

It was six months. It was three times a day, under this Israeli ex-army commando guy, who was a martial arts champion. They met him in Miami and I thought, ‘Wow. This guy won’t take any shit.’ And I wanted someone who was very disciplined, because I didn’t want to control this. I wanted somebody who wasn’t going to kiss my ass. I didn’t want a trainer where I could go, “Well, I don’t feel like working out today.”

This guy took it personally if I didn’t show up. Actually, I was staying at a hotel. I had a late night and I wasn’t answering my phone. He actually came up to the room, knocked on the door. I tried to roll up in a little ball and get the covers over me and hope that he’d go away. The prick went down and got the key…

He was like, “You were out till five in the morning. I heard. I got the report.” He would know where I was and [that] I was out until five am. So after me doing that a couple of times, he pulled me aside and he says, “You see the pictures that we looked at that we want to look like.”

And I say, “Yes.” He said, “When this movie goes, do you want to look like that or do you want to look like this the first time you see yourself up there?’ And I go, ‘I want to look like that.” And so he really put the wood to me… Even when I was out late, I managed to get my tired ass to the gym and just do endless hours, putting on weight. And every time my hands were empty, he’d stick a shake in my hand about this big, and say “Drink.”

A Chat with Amy Weber

Bullz-Eye.com editor Mike Furci sat down with hottie Amy Weber in December to discuss her book, her Borat-style improvisational mockumentary ?Becoming Pony Boi” and much more.

Bullz-Eye: Amy, this is Mike from Bullz-Eye.com. How are you today?

Amy Weber: Good.

BE: Well, I?ve been going to your site here and there and checking it out; very well done by the way. It?s really easy to navigate.

AW: Thank you.

BE: I?ve seen you many times since our last interview and in the magazines. You are one busy person. How did you get this career started? How did you get the ball rolling for yourself?

AW: You know it was really something I wanted to do since I was a young child. But I don?t think when you?re in Illinois a lot of people say oh yeah, you?re going to go out to L.A. and you?re going to become an actress and there?s a lot of support thrown behind you. But you know since I was a little kid I was always doing fine arts contests, which were basically monologues, and winning and entertaining people. It wasn?t until I actually moved to L.A. that I realized that I actually did have a history really as an actress as a kid. It?s just something in you; it?s hard to explain. I think there are other artists that understand. You?re a writer so I just think that there are things that you just want to tell people things, or you want to influence people in some sort of a way, or there are stories in your head that you want to get out there.

To read the entire interview, click here.

Low back pain; relief is possible.

“By the time I saw Ali on Sept. 17, 2007, I was experiencing pain and stiffness, to some degree, 100 percent of the time. On a pain scale from zero to10, 10 being the worst pain I ever felt, I reported a three to eight, depending on the day. The pain had recently started radiating bilaterally into the buttocks, and I was also experiencing some ?low back weakness.? I was having a great deal of difficulty at work, and my workouts were piss-poor to say the least. I also started to experience some depression because after being so active my whole life and loving my job, my prognosis for the future looked pretty grim.

After Ali?s thorough assessment during that first visit, she devised a treatment plan that included muscle stimulation, chiropractic manipulation and ART to the associated muscles. After six visits Ali explained she would re-evaluate to determine the treatment effectiveness and adjust accordingly. I had seen, and heard, quite frequently, that athletes start to feel relief, even after the initial treatment. I wouldn?t have believed it if I didn?t experience it. The evening after my first treatment, and the next day, I had more flexibility and less pain than I did over the last several months. After three visits I couldn?t believe the progress.

Fast forward to today. I have benefited so greatly from the expertise of Dr. Aliann Young (below), ART and disc decompression, that I felt compelled to get the information out to as many of our readers as possible.”

Excerpt from ?Oh My Aching Back!? An interview with Dr. Ali Young

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