BEWARE: Big pharm and big brother want to take over the supplement industry

Our government, which is getting bigger and bigger, is continually trying to take away the rights of us citizens. Being consistent, the government has taken hold of several industries over the last few years to no benefit, and is now set its sights on the supplement industry. The FDA, a sheep in wolves clothing, is claiming they’re interest in taking over the supplement industry is public safety. However, government statistics show that supplements are basically benign, especially when compared to prescription drugs. Not to mention the outstanding natural health benefits associated with supplement intake.

If the government gets their way, they and the pharmaceutical industry know the supplement industry companies won’t be able to afford the FDA’s drug trial process. Most supplement companies will go out of business if supplements, which includes vitamins, are treated as drugs under the new regulations; drug companies like Merk, Pfizer and others will step in and take over.

Drug companies are not in the business of building health. It is in their best interest to have as many unhealthy people as possible. Its so important that big pharma spends more money on ads than it does on research (twice as much). It’s a marketing driven industry, trying to convince people they have an affliction and the drug companies have the answer.

Is it any wonder why there have been so many drug recalls associated with so many deaths. Perhaps if big pharma spent more on research, and the FDA did their job, many people wouldn’t have lost their lives needlessly. And this is who we’re supposed to put our trust in running our supplement industry?

Taken from Mercola.com:

Dietary Supplement Labeling Act of 2011, introduced at the end of June by U.S. Senator Richard Durbin (D-Illinois) is trying to treat vitamins as if they are drugs, allegedly to “improve the safety of dietary supplements,” which implies that supplements must be a major safety hazard to begin with. Durbin’s bill goes hand-in-hand with new FDA regulations that amend the definitions for new dietary ingredients (NDI’s), and together, they can threaten your health and freedom of choice, and further serve to strengthen the fatally flawed paradigm of health and medicine.

An estimated 106,000 hospitalized patients die each year from drugs that, by medical standards, are properly prescribed and administered, and an estimated two million more suffer serious side effects.

How does the safety of supplements compare?

In 2001, 84.6 percent of all substances implicated in fatal poisonings were pharmaceutical drugs, according to that year’s American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) report. This compares with 0.8 percent for all dietary supplements combined, even including substances such as dinitrophenol, a dangerous (and illegal) substance banned in 1938, as well as the central nervous system stimulant Ma Huang (Ephedra). ONE drug alone, the anti-asthma drug theophylline, which was responsible for 15 deaths that year, amounted to 66 percent more than all the available dietary supplements combined.

According to CDC mortality data for 2005, prescription drugs killed more than 33,500 people that year, second only to car accidents. That same year, the American Association of Poison Control Centers reported 27 deaths that were associated with dietary supplements

Legal DRUGS are killing massive numbers of people, not vitamins and supplements. Unfortunately, one reason for all these drug deaths could be the lax way the FDA “regulates” the drug industry by not requiring that all serious events in a trial be made public:

“When a clinical trial that is undertaken by drug companies shows that a drug has serious side effects, there is no law that says that study has to be published or made public in any way,” Dr. Dean says in her book.

Vioxx is a perfect example of a product that was approved without having published all the clinical studies where serious events that resulted in the deaths of over 60,000 people were discovered.

What’s obvious is that the number of people taking supplements and vitamins is continuously growing. It’s a $60-billion-a-year industry, and the drug industry wants a piece of that pie, as evidenced by drug giant Pfizer, which recently announced that it’s going into the supplement business to counter some of the losses from its blockbusters that are soon going off-patent. The FDA is apparently on-track to protect its client’s vitamin and supplement interests by proposing the new policy it slipped in just before July 4.

What can you do? Go HERE and get involved.

Product review: M5 Extreme

M5 Extreme,just another expensive product that can’t deliver what it promises.

There are so many ingredients in this product; some of them are worthless and some are not. Most of the evidence concerning the efficacy of the ingredients in M5 Extreme is anecdotal, which is completely unreliable. A few ingredients have been studied using the double blind method, which is very reliable, but there are too few subjects and they were not young healthy adolescence or athletes. I have a huge problem with this, because these companies extrapolate data and draw conclusions about something unknown.

Some of the main ingredients:
The names of the proprietary blends are hilarious.

Vasodynamic Force – These ingredients are worthless. Are they harmful? No. They’ve been around since the eighties, and shortly died out because they didn’t work. Now they’re being marketed for completely different purpose. Any company with any type of integrity would not use such products.
For more info: Peddling nitric oxide products with voodoo science

Catechotropic Surge – Although products like Bacopa Monnieri Extract has been shown to improve cognition, (Calabrese , Gregory, Leo, Kreamer, & Oken), how do we know it’s pure, the right dose, or if will work for young healthy athletes.

Myosmotic Infusion – Many companies market magnesium creatine chelate (MCC) as being the best creatine product out there for gaining size, strength, speed, etc. because of its absorption ability. But when it comes down to it, good old reliable creatine monohydrate (CM), one of the most studied supplements on the planet, is still king. A study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found plain CM and MCC were similar in performance tests, suggesting that the proposed mechanism of entry (absorption) of MCC is no better than CM when 2.5 g of CM is administered and performance is measured as work. Another ingredient in this infusion, Betaine HCL, is a naturally occurring substance can be recommended by doctors as a supplemental source of hydrochloric acid, especially for those that may suffer from hypochlorhydria, a deficiency of stomach acid production. Betain HCL should always be taken at the start of a meal containing protein! If taken without food, stomach burning may result. I don’t see this anywhere on the product label. If you don’t have a low acid output in your stomach, why take this product?

More Creatine

Creatine is perhaps the most researched supplement on the planet. Yet new data on the benefits of supplementing with this incredible substance is still mounting. Canadian researchers compared the changes in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) amounts in 2 groups of subjects. All the subjects performed at least 30 minutes of structured physical activity 3 -5 X?s per week for eight weeks. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups: One supplementing with creatine, the other, an isocaloric placeo. Muscle biopsies were taken before and after the training period and analyzed for IGF-1 content. The creatine group had a 24% higher level of IGF-1. The creatine group also had a 23% higher increase in type II muscle fibers. These findings were independent of dietary guidelines. (Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 2008; 18(4))

What does this mean for the average Joe? It means if you supplement with creatine, you?ll not only get the well known ?volumizing? effect, but added lean mass.

Q&A with Mike Furci

In my Q&A column posted in January, I discuss the NCAA legality of Tribex and Hardcore ZMA and drug tests, whether or not kids and teens will stunt their growth if they lift weights and use creatine supplements, and I share some fan mail from a wellness chiropractor.

Q: Mike
Nice job on the recent health article. I’m a wellness chiropractor and I’m always looking for ways to communicate ideas of health to people. I never in my life thought I would use Bullz-eye.com as a professional reference, but you did a bang up job writing in simple, but not watered down language.
Do you have links to some of your other works? And, do you have a good form of your recent article that I can hand out (I’d rather not direct conservative clients to bullz-eye.com’s bikini page for nutritional advice. That said, what you wrote needs to get out everywhere in America!

Evan

(Dr. Hughes)
Concord Family Chiropractic

A: DR. Hughes
Thanks so much for your kind words. I understand as a business owner not wanting to offend any clients. Being considerate and service oriented is lacking in for too many businesses. I am glad to hear that there are some people out there as considerate as you. However, I do feel Bullz-eye.com?s ?bikini? features are very tasteful. Offensive, risqu? content, which I understand is subjective, is something Bullz-eye.com?s partners have always wanted to stay away from.

I appreciate you taking the time to visit B-E.com and reading my articles. I’m attaching several articles you can use as hand outs.

Mike

Soy lecithin, hormone replacement, high fat diets and HFCS

Mike weighs in on the pros and cons of hormone replacement therapy, soy lecithin, creatine and HFCS. He also reminds us that while there is a lot of good information on the internet, it’s important to research and consult with experts before using a product. Just because a product is legal doesn’t mean it’s safe or that it works.

Here’s a sample from the article:

Q: Hi Mike,

I was doing some research on HGH in my downtime, and the use of it to treat chronic conditions and developmental issues. Now, I came across this website http://www.rajeun.net/ as a result of my surfing. I had a look at the eight-point anti-aging program this guy has sorted out for himself and thought to myself, ?Gee Justin, be pretty cool if that worked, right??

Now some of it sounds like the usual bunkum; EDTA chelation seems to fit into that category for example.

But — and it’s a big but — in your opinion, if this guy keeps at what he’s been doing, does he have a routine that might give him an advantage over the rest of us when it comes to staying healthier for that bit longer? And following up, if you yourself wanted to go about living for a very long time, would you go down the same path this dude is going down?

In closing, respect for all for your time and encouragement Mike, a whole heap of people appreciate your attitude and your efforts in keeping guys fitter, healthier and happier.

Best regards.

A: Justin,

When it comes to living longer, does it give him an advantage over us? I don’t think there is enough evidence to answer that question. One thing is for sure, your quality of life definitely improves. Men who properly use hormone replacement therapy show an elevated sense of well-being and mood. If it didn’t work, it wouldn?t be such a huge business. There are anti-aging clinics popping up all over the world.

There are parts of his program however, that are a little suspect. Two that jump out at me are EDTA chelation for getting rid of metals in the body, and taking Vermoc to get rid of parasites. My advice to Ellis is to get the hell out of that God-forsaken toilet of a country.

Another part of his program that I take exception to is his endorsement of using Erythropoietin or EPO. EPO is a drug used in the clinical setting to increase hematocrit (red blood cell) levels. EPO is a natural substance produced by the kidneys that stimulates bone marrow to manufacture red blood cells. This drug, if used improperly, can result in death — as seen with Olympic athletes trying to gain an edge in endurance events.

Low hematocrit levels can be caused by many different conditions including blood loss, chemotherapy, HIV or nutritional deficiencies. Obviously, if the cause is nutritional, you’d want to use supplements, not a drug. Just because your hematocrit is low normal, it is no reason to jump on EPO. What Mr. Mexico doesn’t understand is that the drugs he is on, especially testosterone, increases your hematocrit levels. I believe Ellis’ site is a little on the irresponsible side.

Mike

Creatine, the oldest health care in the world, more Vitamin D, 4 things for your health

I this installment of Did you know… I cover an array of topics beginning with the following:

Did you know…

…creatine is perhaps the most researched supplement on the planet? Yet new data on the benefits of supplementing with this incredible substance is still mounting. Canadian researchers compared the changes in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) amounts in two groups of subjects. All the subjects performed at least 30 minutes of structured physical activity three to five times per week for eight weeks. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups: one supplementing with creatine, the other, an isocaloric placeo. Muscle biopsies were taken before and after the training period and analyzed for IGF-1 content. The creatine group had a 24% higher level of IGF-1. The creatine group also had a 23% higher increase in type II muscle fibers. These findings were independent of dietary guidelines. (Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 2008; 18(4))

What does this mean for the average Joe? It means if you supplement with creatine, you?ll not only get the well known ?volumizing? effect, but more muscle fibers.

Testosterone boosters, vegans, creatine and multivitamins

Are taking multivitamins necessary? do they work? How does a vegan get leaner? Should they be eating soy? Are testosterone boosters safe and effective? Which ones should I take and what’s the best way to take them?

Below is a sample of the recent Q&A column on www.bullz-eye.com.

Q:Mike, I?m currently taking a multivitamin because I?m trying to change my health for the better. Is this a good choice? Should I be taking other supplements?

A:Sergio, Short answer No. Multi vitamins are a waste because the absorption is so poor. Some vitamins and minerals compete with one another making absorption even worse.

What I take: Vitamin D (most important) 10,000iu per day, Vitamin A once per week 5000iu, CoQ10 100mg/day, Omega 3 fish oil, CLA, and cook with coconut and olive oils.

I recommend reading my article “Daily consumption for optimum health”, and below are a few other websites to consult.

vitamindcouncil.org
westonaprice.org
vitamin-d-max.com (this is where I purchase vitamin D)
vitacost.com (this is where I get omega 3, CLA and CoQ10.)
therabiotics.net (this is where I get my probiotics)

Supplement savings.

In our never ending quest for a healthier, leaner, stronger body, taking supplements is a must.? While sifting through many supplement sites the other day I came across Vitacost.com.? They offer many different quality brands of supplements at great prices.? I made a purchase about 3 weeks ago and must say, I’m impressed.? I am definitely putting them on my list of favorite supplement sites.

Creatine monohydrate

Creatine is one of the most studied supplements there is. It came under in the late 90′s because of unfounded concerns with dehydration and cramping. These concerns were put to rest after many researchers found no link between creatine and dehydration among athletes. After literally hundreds of studies there appears to but no negative side effects associated with creatine usage at all.

What many people don’t know is that creatine is found naturally in the food we eat. It is found in high levels in red meat. As a matter of fact, this is the main reason why many people who eat red meat regularly don’t seem to get good results with the supplementation of creatine. Creatine does, however, yield great results for most people.

Creatine will work very well for about 30 to 40 percent of the people who use it. Another 30% of the people who use it will claim good results. But unfortunately, about 30% of all creatine users report almost no effect at all. Many of these people may be getting it in their diets.

When taking creatine, use 20 grams per day for the first seven days as a loading phase. Do you need to load up? No, but your muscles will reach their saturation point quicker. After the loading phase, use 10 grams a day for five more weeks. Take the next three to four weeks off, and start again.

Creatine hit the market about 15 years ago and has been one of the top selling supplements since. It’s popularity is due to one reason — it works.

Creatine works by giving the muscle cell what it needs to store ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate). ATP is the energy source our muscles use for heavy-duty, short-term workloads, the type used in weight training, sprintning, wrestling, etc. Creatine has been shown to increase strength in most people by 10%. Endurance athletes will find the use of creatine to be a waste of time because it does not affect that energy system.

Should body builders skip supplements?

There was an interesting article published online at American Chronicle.com about whether or not bodybuilders should?skip supplements in 2007.

The basic idea behind the article was to dispel any rumors that bodybuilders absolutely need to take supplements. They don’t. Like the article details, you can still gain muscle with proper diet and exercise without ever touching a supplement. However, using supplements can in fact, do as they say, and “supplement” your diet.

The supplement quandary is along the same lines of when people try to go to the far ends of the earth to find the perfect workout?routine or diet. If you have the money, the basic supplements can offer a great boost to your overall workout gains. Just don’t get caught up in all the hype of having to have the “latest and greatest”.

The American Chronicle article highlights the five basic supplements that bodybuilders should consider if they want to maximize their workout gains:

1) Whey Protein?

2) Creatine?

3) Glutamine?

4) High-Potency Multivitamin?

5) Essential Fatty Acids?

To see the full article, click here.?

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