The best fat for pilots

The military has a lot invested in training pilots and decided to fund a study to find out which foods are best for them. The University of North Dakota researchers found the 45 pilots who ate the fattiest foods, such as butter or gravy, had the quickest response times in mental tests and made fewer mistakes when flying in tricky cloudy conditions. Surprisingly, after those on the high-fat diet, those on the high carb diet performed the best, with the worst performance from those on the high protein diet.
Enig, Mary., and Sally Fallon. ?Caustic commentary? Wise Traditions, 2009;(10)4:41

A no-nonsense guide to designing your workouts

In my recently rewritten article “A no-nonsense guide to design your workouts“, which is a three-part series, I offer no BS ways for beginners and veterans alike to keep their workouts fresh while consistently making gains.

Everywhere you turn these days, weight training seems to be the focus. And why shouldn’t it be? A proper weight training program produces many positive effects, including: increased muscle mass; reduced body fat; increased bone density; improved insulin sensitivity; improved self-esteem; and overall well-being. The list goes on. Yet with all the information available, why is it so hard for people to make progress? Because most of what is out there is BULLSHIT!!

Helping people is what being a trainer and a coach is all about. Most publishers and editors are so hell-bent on selling magazines, they print things like this: “Put 2 inches on your arms in 21 days;” “Have a chest like Arnold’s in just 6 weeks.” People, just like you, purchase this type of trash in the hopes that it might work. These writers and editors rely on your ignorance.

Having the knowledge and ability to help somebody achieve their goals goes far beyond writing an article about workouts. Writing workouts is actually a pretty easy thing to do. Just about anyone with a little bit of knowledge can do it, and many ? unfortunately — do. The barriers to entry to become a personal trainer are so low, most certificates aren’t worth the paper they’re written on. In contrast, look at the barriers to entry to become a nurse. Several years of school filled with prerequisites, in which you need a 78 percent just to pass, coupled with many hours of hands-on clinicals. What education does a trainer need? Send away for some study guides, take a test, and “Bam!” you’re a certified trainer.

More Creatine

Creatine is perhaps the most researched supplement on the planet. Yet new data on the benefits of supplementing with this incredible substance is still mounting. Canadian researchers compared the changes in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) amounts in 2 groups of subjects. All the subjects performed at least 30 minutes of structured physical activity 3 -5 X?s per week for eight weeks. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups: One supplementing with creatine, the other, an isocaloric placeo. Muscle biopsies were taken before and after the training period and analyzed for IGF-1 content. The creatine group had a 24% higher level of IGF-1. The creatine group also had a 23% higher increase in type II muscle fibers. These findings were independent of dietary guidelines. (Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 2008; 18(4))

What does this mean for the average Joe? It means if you supplement with creatine, you?ll not only get the well known ?volumizing? effect, but added lean mass.

Sweet or Salty? It Could be in the Genes!

Check out this article from Nutritiondata.com and see if you are a “sweet” or “salty”.

We may be predisposed to like salt in our genes which can help gives us clues to our health and fitness.

Love of salt is in your genes

Monday, June 21, 2010 at 4:53 PM | posted by Monica Reinagel, MS, LD/N

In the debate over whether to force manufacturers to reduce sodium in processed foods, I’ve observed that some will benefit more than others. It appears that some will also suffer more than others.

Although we know that people who eat a lot of salt develop a tolerance and preference for saltier foods, Penn State researchers find that genetics also plays a role in how salty you like your food. While some are happy with (or can at least adjust to) food with less salt, others will always find low-sodium foods especially unpalatable.

Interestingly, it seems as if those with hyper-sensitive taste buds (super-tasters) tend to choose saltier foods. Although they experience salt as super-salty, they appear to need more salt in order to block or balance bitter tastes that they experience as super-bitter. (See this summary from Medical News Today.)

This study used healthy volunteers. What I’d like to see now is an investigation into whether the super-taster trait is more or less likely in those with salt-sensitive hypertension!

Coconut: Craze or Credible!

The Chicago Tribune has done some research on the Coconut Craze.

Liz Applegate, director of sports nutrition at the University of California-Davis, thinks coconut water is fine to drink for hydration ? if you like the taste.

Applegate takes issue with some of the health endorsements including weight loss and heart health claims.

It would be nice to see this kind of scrutiny given to all nutritional claims made by big business:

Most of these sites that promote and sell coconut oil originate from coconut-producing countries, including India, Indonesia and the Philippines.

Instead of research studies, you’ll find articles written by coconut oil advocates ? including Mary Enig, vice president of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a controversial organization that is critical of “traditional diets” and extols the benefits of saturated fat.

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