Your guide to healthy Chinese food

Eating Chinese food can also be interpreted as a ?healthy choice.? But as MensFitness.com pointed out, Chinese dishes can be loaded with sodium, fat and calories.

Below is MF?s guide to eating healthier at Chinese restaurants.

Chinese food may be tasty, but more often than not it’s an ab-killer. We asked Jim White, R.D., a Virginia-based dietician, to help us make some smarter choices.

LEARN THE LINGO
Anything steamed is obviously good, as is Jum (poached), Chu (broiled), Kow (roasted), Shu (barbecued), lightly stir-fried, dry stir-fried, or braised. Anything breaded, fried, or coated in flour is not.

USE THE RIGHT TOOLS
Chopsticks are your friend. “You’re going to get less oil than you would with a fork,” adds White.

GET SAUCED
Steer clear of thick gravy or sauces made from sugar, flour, or cornstarch (such as those found on General Tso’s or Sweet and Sour Pork). They’re loaded with corn syrup. Instead, White suggests hot mustard sauce, hoisin sauce, or oyster sauce. And no matter what, always make your order “half sauce.” That way, you get half the sauce?and half the calories?of what they’d normally use in the dish.

GO VEGGIE
Here’s an inside tip: Order your meal cooked in vegetable stock (a traditional Chinese style of cooking called “stock velveted”) to reduce the calories in your dish by 150-300 and the fat by 15-30 grams. “Expect your protein to be a bit more moist and tender, with less crunch than usual,” says White.

SKIP UNNECESSARY SIDES
A serving of crispy noodles can set you back as much as 200 calories and 14 grams of fat, and Lo Mein is even worse. That dark brown color in the noodles? It comes from soaking up all that oil. A large portion generally runs in the thousands of calories.


Click here to read the entire article
.

  

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>